The two letter word that can change your finances forever

Definition of discipline: Making yourself do something you really don’t want to do, in order to get a result you really want to get. – Andy Andrews

A recent study  by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling found that 61% of people don’t have a budget. While there are many reasons why people don’t budget – too busy, think they don’t make enough, don’t know where to start – I think at the heart of many people’s failure to budget is the simple fear that if they had a budget, then they could not have what they want.

Let’s face it; our society isn’t exactly very good at telling ourselves no. The credit industry has made it so easy that there is very little need to think about denying yourself. Whether it is credit cards or 90 days same as cash deals, the message is buy what you want now and worry about paying for it later.vision

The power of “No”

That little word “no” though is one of the keys to financial success. But, (and this is very important!) saying no does not mean you can’t have what you want. In fact, by saying no to less important things, you make sure you will be able to say yes to what really matters. It is really about prioritizing your money. And that’s all a budget really is.

The key to being able to say no is understanding what you want to say yes to.

What helps give us the ability to say no is knowing what is at stake and having a vision of what could be. If you aren’t connected to the larger vision, then in a moment, you cave and say yes to something you really ought to say no to. Remember that when you say no you are saying yes to something bigger and more significant.

So what do you really want? What are your goals? What matters most to you?

Maybe it’s travel. Maybe you wish you had a bigger house or a house in a better neighborhood. Maybe it’s a hobby that you really love to pursue. Maybe you dream of being able to quit your job and stay home with the kids.

Maybe if things are really tight, you just really want to make sure you can continue to provide food and shelter for your family or perhaps you dream of what it would be like to be debt free.

Spend some time thinking about those dreams. What is really most important to you?

Write them down

Once you have decided on what your goals are, write them down. There is power in written goals. Goals that are not written down are just wishes.

Put them where you will see them

Once you have written them down, keep them somewhere that you will see them. Post them on the refrigerator or the bathroom mirror. Tack them on the wall at work. Attach then to the visor in the car. Maybe put them in your wallet next to that plastic.

By having it somewhere you will see it, when you are tempted to spend money, you have a reminder of what you really want most.

Create your budget with your goals in mind

Now create that budge,t but think about those goals as you decide how you will spend your money.

I can have the super-sized cable package with 546 channels, but if I do that I can’t save for that vacation I really want to enjoy with my family. Maybe I could downsize, as I never watch 90% of those channels anyway, or maybe I could do away with cable all together.

I can plan to eat out with my buddies at the office each day. But if on the other hand I saved that $100 a month I am spending on lunches, I could retire someday with more than a half a millon dollars in savings.

I could buy a new car like my neighbor just did, but if I have a $450 car payment then I won’t be able to pay any extra on my credit cards and I’ll be in debt for years. Or I could squeeze a couple more years out of my current car, buckle down, and knock out that debt.

Keeping the greater vision in mind

Andy Andrews defines discipline as making yourself do something you really don’t want to do, in order to get a result you really want to get. That’s really at the heart of successful budgeting. It would be nice if we all made so much money that we could have anything we wanted, but for almost all of us that isn’t the case. And so we must make choices.

Understand that every time you say yes to a purchase, you are also saying no to something else you could be doing with that money. That doesn’t mean you should feel guilty any time you buy something. But by having that bigger picture vision of what you really desire, you have a framework for making sure you say yes to what matters most.

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